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What Being a Dad Taught me about Style

What Being a Dad Taught me about Style

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Becoming a father is an amazing thing. 

It brings you a whole new sense of love, purpose and responsibility. 

It's also a time of self-reflection and introspection.

You start to think; what is important? Who am I, really? What king of example do I want to set? How can I be a better role model?

On top of solidifying your identity, you also have much less time for yourself. And so you have to re-organize your life and make things as efficient as possible.

And, yes, that means re-thinking and re-organize your wardrobe too.  

What I've found - which has been most fulfilling - is the style and wardrobe philosophies we've been preaching for years here at AOS have only been re-enforced in fatherhood.

Here's some examples of what I mean, and some tips to stay stylish as a dad:

Time

You have much less time - so any minutes you can save makes a big impact. 

Having a tightly curated wardrobe is critical. You simply don't have time to put new outfits together or change items in the mirror. 

Curating your wardrobe (ie. creating a versatile Capsule Wardrobe) is the only way to get by with style.

Since welcoming Sofia I've cut-down my wardrobe considerably. I donated everything that I don't wear often and only kept my favorite pieces, making sure that everything works together.

Versatility

The AOS philosophy of being able to "get dressed in the dark" used to be just a concept.

Now it is very real. I get dressed in the dark often - feeling for a pair of trousers, a shirt, a jacket. 

The fact that all of my clothes work together means that I can get dressed in under a minute without worrying about how things come together.

Durability

As a father your clothing will take more wear and tear. 

Spit ups. Spills. Wrinkles. Washing. 

I've focused on hard-wearing fabrics that get better with age - like corduroy, moleskin, flannel, denim, etc. 

This is another core AOS philosophy that was re-enforced by fatherhood. 

Longevity

I rarely go out and buy new items anymore. 

Good news is, I already have all the pieces I need. And they will never go out of style. 

There is an important sense of relief and security knowing that I have everything I need, and I'm not searching for new things.

E-Commerce

E-commerce is life. 

For the same reason as above, being able to shop conveniently (from my iPhone while I'm watching the baby) is super key.

I buy almost everything online now - from socks and underwear to shoes and accessories. 

I know we have a lot of clients who are fathers, and it makes me feel good that we can provide a high level of personalized service conveniently for guys who don't have time to visit stores, book appointments, etc. 

Maturity

A new sense of maturity blooms. 

I don't feel the need to buy/wear items that are "cool" or "trendy". 

I don't want to be a "fashion plate". I want to dress like a gentleman in classic items that portray character, integrity and trustworthiness. Wearing classic items, that are "me", brings me a sense of reliable "dad style". 

Comfort

Being comfortable is more important than ever. 

I'm focused on cozy items like soft seasonal fabrics, cashmeres, chunky sweaters, etc. There's nothing better than cuddling your daughter wearing cozy items that she can snuggle into. 

Also having wider cuts (no more super "slim fits") makes a world of difference. As a dad, you never want to feel restricted by your clothing. Being able to move freely, and react quickly, actually becomes a point of safety. 

High/Low

Having items that you can "dress up" (with loafers or dress boots) or "dress down" (with sneakers and jeans) is key. 

I'm wearing more sneakers than ever - but my tailored garments work seamlessly and create a sense of being "put together" that is also "easy". 

What about you?

I'd love to hear from the dads out there...

How has fatherhood changed your style/wardrobe?

Any tips for new dads out there that want to dress with style?

Use the comments section below.

Thanks, as always, for reading. 

Yours in style,

Dan Trepanier

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