Fresco, Italian for Fresh

March 28th, 2016

Lightweight menswear fabric is not all about linen and cotton. I know, wearing wool on hot days can seem counter-intuitive, but the right wool (bred in Australian, tightly spun into very thin yarns, then woven with a porous texture) is as light and breathable as it gets.

Take Fresco for example; a crisp, cool wool that’s designed for maximum breathability. The word fresco is derived from the Italian word affresco, which means ”fresh”. It’s a textured open weave (similar to hopsack) made from tropical wool that’s best known for it’s airy property – you can literally feel a light breeze pass right through this beauty and it can keep you cool even on the hottest days.

Fresco is the perfect non-crease alternative to linen – it has a crisp, dry texture that serves to draw moisture to the exterior and allow it to evaporate. So if you’re not the type to embrace the casual crumple of linen (although we wish you would) you’ll absolutely love Fresco because of it’s superior wrinkle-releasing qualities. It isn’t a fragile fabric either; it’s made by twisting several long yarns together in order to give it the strength needed to compensate for the fabric’s loose weave.

With that said, we hit the streets of Los Angeles with three different gentlemen (Dietrich, Will and David) on a hot day to make sure they could each stay cool in our Medium Grey Fresco.



    Three-piece fresco suit, hidden placket shirt (no tie), and a cotton car coat.

    That’s what we call smooth Spring/Summer layering.




    The beauty of a true medium grey is that you can wear it most of the year (you’ll need the right layers to amp up the weight in the winter – more on that later), you can pair it with just about any shirt/tie combination, and you can wear it with any color footwear – black, dark brown, light brown, something a little more splashy…

    We’re not only maximizing breathability with this one, but also versatility.


    • Eyewear Vintage
    • Grey Stripe Cutaway Shirt by RL Purple Label
    • Grey crepe tie by Marshall Anthony
    • “Warwick” monkstrap loafers by Allen Edmonds

    The Jacket


    The other great thing about Fresco is that it’s kind of like the Spring/Summer alternative to a good supple flannel. What I mean is that the texture of the cloth allows the garment to be worn as a suit, as well as hold its own as a separate jacket.

    Fresco has just enough texture to contrast with a pair of jeans or a sleek worsted wool, like our dark chocolate trousers here, which have been one of the most popular “odd trousers” in our collection, for good reason.

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    Medium Grey Fresco-5

    Medium Grey Fresco 3-Piece Suit

    We also have this Italian Fresco fabric available in other colors. Just shoot me an email ( once you’ve filled out your client account, and I can personally help you put together a summer wardrobe including this incredible cloth.

    Fresco Swatch

    Click to enlarge for fabric texture. 

    Thanks, as always, for reading.

    Yours in style,

    Dan Trepanier

    Photography by Alex Crawford.

    • Michael Garcie

      Love all the great looks. You did a great job showcasing different combinations with ties, shirts and the car coat. I don’t like the wrinkles of linen so I think I’ll try it. My only reservation is using an online format. However, with so many positive testimonials and pictures, looks like it definitely works.

    • OD

      All the posts are showing Dan’s clothing line which mainly consists of suits! This has become extremely boring and monotonous! I have been a fan since their beginning but today I just came to post this message…bring some creativity back, fellas!

      • AFH

        #menswear peaked a while ago, and Dan had been getting bored anyway – you could tell. I’m guessing he wears suits most days now, and just isn’t as into the hi-lo stuff as he used to be – and doesn’t much want to feature $2000 tracksuits.

      • Brooks

        There’s been three profiles since August. I remember when Dan said that he hoped to make the site one where it wasn’t just about his clothes, but where he would be showing how other individuals defined their own personal style and spoke of their characters using clothing. It feels like it’s regressed a bit.

        I mean, you have two people in this very article that we know almost nothing about. Do a profile of Dietrich or David! How would they choose to wear the suit separates, rather than you styling them?

        I just miss the focus on other people. This site feels so navel-gazey lately. I totally get the idea of building the brand, building the image, but we’re only getting one perspective anymore. It’s not a bad perspective in the least, but you can only get so much from one person.

      • TimL

        I’m just popping in to see what’s new and then popping out.
        I miss the old style of take a look at the fly sport coats and slacks with cool shoes.
        Not so interesting with all the suite promotions. I’m not buying $1000 suites from anyone and like to get ideas and find bargains that looks great.

        • AFH

          The basic problem is you want free content, but it’s difficult to monetise that. They clearly tried.

          At some point, they might get bored again and change up a little bit – I do wonder how Alex dresses these days. But for now, they’re building the foundations of a money-making business and there’s not exactly a dearth of content on the interwebs.

    • Dave Minella

      I’m seeing a lot of cuffing on flat-front pants this season. Is it time to break the cuffs-with-pleats rule? Should I be asking for cuffs on my trousers for the spring? Also, breaks are getting a little bit longer, it seems. Do I need to have my breaks taken down as well? I was just beginning to get comfortable with showing a bit of ankle.

      • TO

        Dave Minella, my thoughts. As long as the cuff isn’t that noticeable (like being 3″ wide or something crazy) almost any pair of trousers under the sun are fair game for a cuff (taking into account whether they are pleated or not).

        As to your second question, it’s usually better to err on the side of going with what you’re comfortable with in this situation.
        That being said, in a perfect world I would prefer to not have any amount of ankle/sock showing (outside of a tropical/hot weather/etc. sockless situation) not even the little ‘slice’ peeking above the side of the shoe. But I also generally prefer only a slight break, so it sometimes comes down to comprise. Bottom line- go with what you like!