Tailoredwear Innovation at Liberty Fairs

February 18th, 2015

We’re live at the Liberty Fairs show in Las Vegas this week, scoping out the best menswear coming up for Fall/Winter 2015.

My favorite brands to watch are those who put innovative spins on classic tailored pieces. We look for traditional designs with modern twists so subtle that the garment appears up-to-date but doesn’t lose its timeless appeal.

Here are some of the innovations happening in the tailoring space that we’re excited about.

    The Wool Suiting Shirt

    mensstylelibertydan (9 of 17)

    Southwick has been making hand-made tailored garments in Massachussets since 1929 for major fashion brands like Brooks Brothers and Ralph Lauren. Their own private line Southwick Clothing is a very tasteful take on classic American sportswear. Think soft-shouldered flannel sport coats and striped cotton oxford shirts.

    This shirt might be my favorite product from the entire show. It’s a classic American semi-spread shirt cut from an Italian wool suiting cloth. It’s a lightweight super 120s wool in a grey-on-grey windowpane. The shirt is surprisingly smooth and comfortable. It also breathes noticeably better than a cotton fabric, as wool is known to do.

    Tomorrow we’ll show you a suit in this exact fabric.

    mensstylelibertydan (10 of 17)

    The coat by Aspesi is a a beauty as well. A well-made, trim-cut mac like this one in a sturdy navy blue cotton is the type of garment that can be a foundational wardrobe item for 10 or more years.

    mensstylelibertydan (11 of 17) mensstylelibertydan (12 of 17) mensstylelibertydan (13 of 17)

    The Reversible Topcoat/Raincoat

    mensstylelibertydan (8 of 17)

    I’m usually not a fan of “hybrid” clothing but this reversible overcoat, handmade in Italy by Lardini, is a really brilliant and beautiful design. It’s kind of like having a topcoat and a raincoat in one.

    On one side it’s a tough gingham tweed fabric, with peak lapels, soft shoulders and patch pockets. On the other side, it’s a water-resistant raincoat in a solid navy blue nylon. Genius.

    mensstylelibertydan (1 of 17)mensstylelibertydan (3 of 17)

    mensstylelibertydan (5 of 17) mensstylelibertydan (6 of 17)   mensstylelibertydan (30 of 1)

    Smart Clothes

    mensstylelibertydan (14 of 17)

    For all the vintage and heritage guys out there, you’ll appreciate this one.

    Southwick also builds-in a digital ID tag in all of their garments. Scanning this tag allows them to pull up information on the specific garment; the date it was made, the original source of the fabric and inputs, who the garment was made for, etc.

    I think this is a brilliant concept for well-made tailored garments that are built to last the test of time. It’s essentially a digital cataloging system. It creates an important sense of transparency in the manufacturing and selling processes. Imagine if you could use an app to pull-up manufacturing information for all the Harris Tweed sportscoats and other random heritage goods hanging in your local vintage shops.

    mensstylelibertydan (15 of 17) mensstylelibertydan (16 of 17) mensstylelibertydan (17 of 17)

    Thanks, as always, for reading.

    Yours in style,

    Dan Trepanier


    Photography by Alex Crawford.

    • M

      The coats in #1 and #2 look a little big in the body?
      Especially #1, I think it’s wide in the chest.
      And agreed, that burgundy jacket is really elegant.

    • Kyle Leon Norville

      I really like the third look. That tweed is really appealing. Not to mention those boots are something beautiful.

    • http://ledebonnaire.tumblr.com/ Juan Zara

      Great to see you rep Trad American clothing, Dan! That Southwick herringbone tweed sport coat looks amazing. A great case for the 3-roll-2 sack with natural shoulders and flapped patch pockets.

    • James Wong

      I know its not a focus piece but that maroon jacket is amazing!

    • Miguel

      Love all three pieces but I have to say that the shirt probably wins it for me, it looks classy and it can be dress up or down, the material looks fantastic.

      • Daniel

        How will a shirt in suiting fabric hold up to sweat and being washed? I know wool breathes well, but surely you’ll have to wash the shirt, and washing (or even dry-cleaning) it regularly can’t be good for it.

        • http://ledebonnaire.tumblr.com/ Juan Zara

          Wool is washable. Just have to be more careful than with cotton.
          Hand wash it (or put it in your washer by itself on a delicates/wool cycle), use a mild (possibly organic) detergent made specifically for wool. Organic hair conditioner works great but it’s awfully expensive, so Woolite is your best bet if you’re on a budget.

          Never, ever, throw it (or any other item of clothing, for that matter) in the drier. Let it dry by placing it on a cotton towel and laying it flat.

    • tommyjohn_45

      The company I work for has been messing around with similar technology to what Southwick implemented here, but to enhance the shopping experience. When trying items on, it can recognize the item you’re wearing and make suggestions that go well with the items you’re testing. Crazy stuff..

      Love the reversible coat, especially as a traveler. Speaking of which, I just landed in Miami,can anyone recommend any places to shop/visit?

      • Miguel

        I always visit Bayside for sightseeing and food. Shopping, I guess by southbeach there’s this street (no cars, only walking) that’s full of restaurants and stores, forgot the name.

        • tommyjohn_45

          Thanks Miguel.. Lincoln Road I believe you are referring to? Haven’t checked out Bayside before, hopefully I bump into Zach and Screech ;)

    • jT

      Dan, why does the hem on your suit pants look so sffected? Like it’s tucked in instead of hemmed?

    • od

      “but doesn’t loose its timeless appeal.”
      should be “lose”

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