Not-So-Traditional Tailoring feat. Nick Wooster

July 25th, 2011

Nick Wooster is a Manhattan based men’s fashion consultant, and one of my personal style icons – I don’t think I have seen anybody look tougher and more masculine in contemporary tailored clothing.

Labeled by GQ as an ““Internet Superstar Fashion Director”, Wooster’s veteran fashion career began at Barney’s New York as a buyer and then onto the likes of Bergdorf Goodman, Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren, and John Bartlett where he became President. Most recently he held the title of Men’s Fashion Director for Neiman Marcus and Bergdorf Goodman.

In May of 2005, Nick began the successful Wooster Consultancy and has since worked with clients such as as Thom Browne, Mac Cosmetics, Chaiken Clothing, and most recently, Gilt Groupe.

Today, Nick has become a fashion icon and internet phenomenon where his unparalleled take on tailored menswear graces the pages of just about every men’s fashion blog.

A couple weeks ago we visited Nick near his Westside apartment to meet the man behind all those awesome photos, chat about the industry and the pros (and cons) of internet fashion stardom, and yes, take more pictures of him.

Here, Nick gives us a little insight behind what he’s into this summer.

1. Tailored Camo

“The last time I wore this jacket was when I was photographed in it…so it seemed like a good way to start.  I love the idea of subverting a beautifully tailored jacket in camo.  The fabric and fit are supreme, and I love the idea of a matching jacket and tie.”

Bonus Tip: Once you have the essentials (like fit, color coordination, confidence, etc) mastered, then you can become a man of great detail. I’m talking about things like a bandana as a pocket square, cargo shorts with a jacket and tie, a military inspired belt paired with camo, mismatched captoe/wingtip brogues, and an old school mustache curl to coincide with the unbuttoned collar point curl. As you can see, the man is no rookie.

  • Camo jacket by Michael Bastian ·
  • Camo tie by Michael Bastian ·
  • Silver tie bar by Thom Browne ·
  • Tan cargo shorts by +J Uniqlo ·
  • Red bandana pocket square picked up at Nepenthes NY ·
  • Khaki canvas military belt by JCrew ·
  • Mismatched brogue shoes by Trickers x Engineered Garments ·
  • Gold reflective aviators by Ray Ban
  • · Blue oxford cloth shirt by Thom Browne

Blue USA Oxford Shirt

2. Jacket, Tie, Shorts

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“For me, this deep indigo jacket is the perfect navy blazer for summer.  Up close it looks like denim, but it’s much lighter and softer.  It goes with just about anything, including dark denim jeans.”

Bonus Tip: Rugged textured fabrics, like the denim-like cotton here, make a tailored jacket more appropriate to wear casually.

“I also love the idea of a tie in shirting fabrics [madras, oxford cloth, chino, seersucker] during the summer.  For me, silk seems too dressy and weight inappropriate for the heat.”

Bonus Tip II: More guys seem to be okay with wool ties in the winter, than cotton or linen ones in the summer. Just another example of guys forgetting about their options come the warmer months. Don’t let your style go out the open window when it gets warm out.

“I also love the idea of a colored brogue [or wingtip].  If you wear tons of solid neutral colors, a really “off” color of a classic wingtip is a great way to create an instant look.  But I only recommend this if you already have the perfect black, light and dark brown brogues, first.”

Bonus Tip III: I agree. With a statement shoe, keep the majority of your look relatively neutral/classic in color. Also, green is a very underrated color for leathers.

White USA Oxford Shirt

3. Sneaky Leopard

“I love shades of khaki, and this is my spin. These pants are incredible…I want to wear them all of the time, and I wish I had them in shorts as well.  They may not be for everyone, but you could easily substitute the leopard for a camo, and the effect would be the same.”

Bonus Tip: When you see everybody doing it (like camo, for example), find a way to put your own spin on it – like this subtle “leopard” print in traditional camo colors for example.

Bonus Tip II: Again, the devil is in the details: mismatched brogues, 3 button with lapels rolled-to-the-2nd, oxford sleeves cut-off for the summer/ease of rolling, seersucker pocket square, tatoos peaking from under unbuttoned working cuffs (that Nick had cut himself).

“Left foot is a wingtip, right foot is a cap toe [yes, they are a pair].  This is my favorite shoe of the summer.”

  • Khaki jacket by Junya Watanbe x Brooks Brothers ·
  • Camo leopard print trouser by Michael Bastian ·
  • Brown mismatched brogue shoes by Trickers x Engineered Garments ·
  • Pink oxford shirt by Thom Browne

4. Pinstripe Cut-Offs

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“The minute I saw this jacket at the GANT Michael Bastian presentation, I had to own it.  For me, it’s the perfect summer jacket that will go with everything – a pair of jeans, chinos, shorts, seersucker, just about anything, except another madras plaid.”

Bonus Tip: Navy and madras just works. This look is similar to the 2nd, but flipped.

Bonus Tip II: All things in proportion: like pinstripe wool trousers cut just-right into shorts, and a smaller, sleeker bow tie.

  • Plaid jacket by GANT Michael Bastian ·
  • Sunglasses by GANT Michael Bastian ·
  • Navy suede brogue shoes by Church’s ·
  • Brown leather belt with washed brass plaque by Rugby Ralph Lauren ·
  • Navy pinstripe shorts (repurposed suit pants) by J.Crew ·
  • Navy/Red rep stripe bow tie by Polo Ralph Lauren
  • · Blue oxford cloth shirt by Thom Browne

Blue USA Oxford Shirt

5. Shark Attack

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“For me this is the perfect thing to wear to a summer evening wedding.  It’s dressed up with a sense of humor [I hope].”

Bonus Tip: The sharp lines and monochromatic palette make this look badass, perfectly complimented by the whimsical cropped trousers.

Essential Worsted Suit in Charcoal

White USA Oxford Shirt

Thanks for reading, and special thanks to Nick for participating!

Yours in style,

Articles of Style

 

Photography by Brent Eysler.